Noted Film Programmer and Instructor Elliot Lavine

Dates
September 26 - November 14, 2018
September 26, 2018
The Graduate
(1967; directed by Mike Nichols)
October 3, 2018
Point Blank
(1967; directed by John Boorman)
October 10, 2018
The Swimmer
(1968; directed by Frank Perry)
October 17, 2018
Petulia
(1968; directed by Richard Lester)
October 24, 2018
The French Connection
(1971; directed by William Friedkin)
October 31, 2018
Badlands
(1973; directed by Terrence Malick)
November 7, 2018
The Conversation
(1973; directed by Francis Ford Coppola)
November 14, 2018
The Long Goodbye
(1973; directed by Robert Altman)
Delivery
In-Person on Wednesdays
11:00 AM - 1:30 PM PST
Cinema 21 Theatre
616 NW 21st Ave
Portland, Oregon 97209
Cost
$99
Contact
PACE@oregonstate.edu
541-737-4197

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After thirty years of strict enforcement of the Motion Picture Production Code, Hollywood finally, in the mid-1960s, triumphantly smashed the shackles of censorship and proudly proclaimed its independence from the Puritanical constraints that had defined the very nature of commercial American moviemaking. Hollywood at long last began to embrace images and ideas that had formerly been considered strictly unacceptable and off-limits. Eventually provocative subject matter, coarse language, a pre-occupation with violence, and increasingly more adult sexual content soon became commonplace as domestic films exploded with fresh urgency across movie screens.

This fertile and adventurous period in Hollywood history is intended not only as an appreciation for a select group of films, but also as a reflective look at times in which they were made. The films being produced often mirrored the dramatic events taking place across the country and the world: a bloody and seemingly endless war in Viet Nam, racial tensions tearing American cities apart, growing mistrust of political leadership, and a burgeoning sexual revolution all contributed to a new and challenging identity for American films.

Filmmakers like Mike Nichols, Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola, and William Friedkin helped re-invent American cinema during this creatively rambunctious period and were now among the ruling members of the New Hollywood. Seemingly, all bets were off as Hollywood now found itself entering a bold and provocative new chapter of its ever evolving history.

This intensive eight-week survey of American films produced from the mid-60s to mid-70s will provide a vividly penetrating backdrop for an unusual and highly stimulating cinematic experience.

Instructor Elliot Lavine

Instructor Photo

Elliot Lavine has been a film programmer of national repute since 1990, both in the San Francisco Bay Area and now here in Portland. In 2010, he received the Marlon Riggs Award from the San Francisco Film Critics Circle for his revival of rare archival titles and his role in the renewed popularity of film noir. He has taught film studies courses for Stanford's Continuing Studies Program since 2006.

About the Films

The Graduate

A young college grad, uncertain of his own future, has an affair with an older woman who turns out to be the mother of the girl he later falls in love with. A ground-breaking exploration of the frustrations and dilemmas facing those on the brink of adulthood. Starring Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross. Directed by Mike Nichols. 106 mins. 1967.

Point Blank

A criminal is double-crossed and left for dead by his partners, only to reappear as an avenging angel of death, determined to retrieve the stolen money he believes to be his. A blistering modern noir, designed to leave a lasting impression. Starring Lee Marvin, Angie Dickinson, Keenan Wynn, Carroll O'Connor. Directed by John Boorman. 92 mins. 1968.

The Swimmer

A frustrated, middle-aged suburbanite spends a fateful summer’s day swimming from one backyard pool to another throughout his affluent neighborhood and, by doing so, unravels the hidden mysteries that have haunted his life. From John Cheever's famous short story. Starring Burt Lancaster, Janice Rule, Janet Landgard,. Directed by Frank Perry. 95 mins. 1968.

Petulia

An emotionally complex study of an unhappily married socialite and the recently divorced doctor she falls in love with. But this is not an easy picture, as the peripheral issues surrounding these characters are anything but typical. Starring Julie Christie, George C. Scott, Richard Chamberlain, Shirley Knight, and Joseph Cotten. Directed by Richard Lester. 105 mins. 1968.

The French Connection

Fast and violent cop thriller created a whole new set of rules as to what could be done in an American film and took home the Oscar for Best Picture in the process. A compulsively watchable film that is unafraid to raise the bar at every step of the way. Starring Gene Hackman, Roy Scheider, Fernando Rey, Tony Lo Bianco. Directed by William Friedkin. 104 mins. 1971.

Badlands

An aimless young drifter pulls an impressionable teenage girl into a terrifying and violent murder spree that stretches across the vast midwestern badlands. Based on the famous Charlie Starkweather / Caryl Fugate case that sparked nationwide attention in the late 1950s. Starring Martin Sheen, Sissy Spacek, Warren Oates. Written and directed by Terrence Malick. 94 mins. 1973.

The Conversation

An increasingly paranoid surveillance expert slowly comes to realize that the young couple he's been hired to spy on, will soon be murdered. A devastating personal drama. Starring Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Frederic Forrest, Cindy Williams. Directed by Francis Ford Coppola. 113 mins. 1973.

The Long Goodbye

Controversial adaptation of Raymond Chandler's 1953 private eye novel puts gumshoe Philip Marlowe in 1973 Los Angeles and a world of deception, murder, and staggering revelations. Starring Elliott Gould, Nina van Pallandt, Sterling Hayden, Mark Rydell, Henry Gibson, Jim Bouton. Directed by Robert Altman. 112 mins. 1973.

  • Elliot Lavine

    Elliot Lavine has been a film programmer of national repute since 1990, both in the San Francisco Bay Area and now here in Portland. In 2010, he received the Marlon Riggs Award from the San Francisco Film Critics Circle for his revival of rare archival titles and his role in the renewed popularity of film noir. He has taught film studies courses for Stanford's Continuing Studies Program since 2006.