Join Noted Film Programmer and Instructor Elliot Lavine on Saturday mornings at 11:00: January 12 - March 23

Dates
January 12 - March 23, 2019
No class on Saturday, March 2
January 12, 2019
On Dangerous Ground
(1951; directed by Nicholas Ray)
January 19, 2019
The Big Heat
(1953; directed by Fritz Lang)
January 26, 2019
Pick Up on South Street
(1953; directed by Samuel Fuller)
February 2, 2019
99 River Street
(1953; directed by Phil Karlson)
February 9, 2019
Crime Wave
(1954; directed by Andre DeToth)
February 16, 2019
The Big Combo
(1955; directed by Joseph H. Lewis)
February 23, 2019
Kiss Me Deadly
(1955; directed by Robert Aldrich)
March 9, 2019
The Killing
(1956; directed by Stanley Kubrick)
March 16, 2019
Nightfall
(1957; directed by Jacques Tourneur)
March 23, 2019
Touch of Evil
(1958; directed by Orson Welles)
Delivery
In-Person on Saturdays
11:00 AM PST
Cinema 21 Theatre
616 NW 21st Ave
Portland, Oregon 97209
Cost
$129
Must pay for entire ten-week course. No individual tickets will be sold.
Contact
PACE@oregonstate.edu
541-737-4197

Ask us about Workforce Development Training. We can customize this program to fit your organization's specific needs.

As we have come to learn, Film Noir first exploded dramatically across American movie screens at the very beginning of the 1940's, a decade consumed with the aftermath of the Great Depression and the Second World War, preoccupations that would become the root concerns of this exciting new style of filmmaking. As the 1950's dawned, an entirely new scenario greeted the movie-going public, one now dominated by the growing concern that the threat of communism would soon envelop the nation (not to mention the pervasive Blacklist that resulted from these fears) and the vague, fatalistic sense of doom generated by the dread of inevitable nuclear annihilation. Quite a backdrop for some of the decade's most creatively ambitious films!

Film Noir in the fifties reflected the harsh reality of this wildly uncertain period with an onslaught of highly stylized, violent crime thrillers, all branded with the red-hot, nervous stamp of their times while never losing sight of the rigid visual standards that would separate them from the less fanciful, more expensive films that flooded the field. Radical subtexts provided writers and directors the chance to insinuate subversive political and sexual nuances into their gritty yet glamorous, down and dirty crime stories.

This highly intensive TEN WEEK class will highlight classic noir films from acknowledged Hollywood masters Fritz Lang, Orson Welles (both in front of and behind the camera), Jacques Tourneur, Joseph H. Lewis and Andre DeToth, as well as provocative films from the exciting new breed of directors who came of age in the 1950s like Nicholas Ray, Samuel Fuller, Robert Aldrich, Phil Karlson and Stanley Kubrick. Silver screen icons like Robert Ryan, Ida Lupino, Glenn Ford, Gloria Grahame, Lee Marvin, Richard Widmark, Sterling Hayden, Richard Conte, John Payne, Anne Bancroft, Charlton Heston and many others turn up in career-defining roles, marking this decade as one of the most electrifying in Hollywood's long and glorious history.

 

Instructor Elliot Lavine

Instructor Photo

Elliot Lavine has been a film programmer of national repute since 1990, both in the San Francisco Bay Area and now here in Portland. In 2010, he received the Marlon Riggs Award from the San Francisco Film Critics Circle for his revival of rare archival titles and his role in the renewed popularity of film noir. He has taught film studies courses for Stanford's Continuing Studies Program since 2006.

About the Films

These are the films we will be watching together IN THEIR ENTIRETY on the BIG SCREEN at Cinema 21 in Portland.

  1. On Dangerous Ground (1951; Nicholas Ray)
  2. The Big Heat (1953; Fritz Lang)
  3. Pick Up on South Street (1953; Samuel Fuller)
  4. 99 River Street (1953; Phil Karlson)
  5. Crime Wave (1954; Andre DeToth)
  6. The Big Combo (1955; Joseph H. Lewis)
  7. Kiss Me Deadly (1955; Robert Aldrich)
  8. The Killing (1956; Stanley Kubrick)
  9. Nightfall (1957; Jacques Tourneur)
  10. Touch of Evil (1958; Orson Welles)
  • Elliot Lavine

    Elliot Lavine has been a film programmer of national repute since 1990, both in the San Francisco Bay Area and now here in Portland. In 2010, he received the Marlon Riggs Award from the San Francisco Film Critics Circle for his revival of rare archival titles and his role in the renewed popularity of film noir. He has taught film studies courses for Stanford's Continuing Studies Program since 2006.