Join us for this special research-driven speakers' series in Portland featuring OSU experts, on a variety of essential - and timely - topics affecting Oregon.

Designed For
Members of the public, professionals, and Portland-based OSU alumni.
Dates
Mondays, 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm. Refreshments provided.
April 3 – June 12, 2017
Delivery
On-site at the Collaborative Life Science Building
(2730 SW Moody Ave, Portland, OR)
Cost
$99
Length
10 weeks

The College of Public Health and Human Sciences is excited to host Certified Northwest: A Course in Public Health.

Those working in the field of health or social services - as well as OSU alumni - enjoy free admission with discount code PDXHEALTH during registration. Attend only sessions of interest - or attend all 10 and earn a Certified Northwest digital badge shareable on social media. 

This course will highlight 10 public health issues important for all Oregonians taught by experts from the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University.

Topics covered will include:

  • Disaster preparedness
  • Health care policy
  • Nutrition
  • Cross-cultural communication
  • Food and nutrition
  • Caregiving
  • And more!

Learn from the Public Health Experts

Course content will include lecture, activities and online materials to support each topic.

The course will be offered on Monday evenings from 6:00 pm -7:50 pm beginning April 3rd through June 5th in the Collaborative Life Science Building (2730 SW Moody Ave, Portland, OR).

The following speakers with tentative topics for their lectures are listed below:

  • April 3, 2017: Jeff Bethel – “Getting Ready for the Big One”
  • April 10, 2017: Carolyn Aldwin – "Biopsychosocial Aging: How Stress Gets Under the Skin"

  • April 17, 2017: Kate MacTavish – "Health trajectories: Why zipcodes matter more than genetic codes"
  • April 24, 2017: Javier Nieto – “Sleep and Health”
  • May 1, 2017: Sunil Khanna – “You Just Don’t Understand: Cultural Humility, Communication and Health”
  • May 8, 2017: Rick Settersten – “Journey to Adulthood: The long and winding road"

  • May 15, 2017: Stephanie Grutzmacher – “Local Food, Good Nutrition”
  • May 22, 2017: Dave Dallas – “Human Milk and Your Baby’s Health”
  • June 5, 2017: Carolyn Mendez-Luck – "Caregiving in Cultural Context”
  • June 12, 2017: Jeff Luck – “Health Care System, What's next for Obamacare?”
  • Kate MacTavish

    Kate's research centers on examining how small towns and rural places function for the children and families who call them home. Since 1997, she has been examining contextual factors that shape developmental pathways for children and youth in the distinctly lower-income rural context of a trailer park.

  • Carolyn Mendez-Luck

     

    Carolyn Mendez-Luck is an Assistant Professor with the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. 

    Her main research focus has been to examine the motivations and meanings of the caregiver role and the interpersonal dynamics within the care giving dyad. Her expertise is in qualitative, survey, and intervention research methods, which she has applied to understanding the social and cultural factors associated with adult development and aging in Latino families.

    Carolyn's research is community-based, interdisciplinary, and rooted in principles of health equity. As such, her research studies have involved primary data collection in underserved communities, and she has over 15 years of experience working with underserved populations.

    One of her long term research goals is to link individual health and well-being to family health and well-being by identifying the effects of the family environment and social relationships on the aging trajectories of racial/ethnic minority adults. In the next 5-10 years, Carolyn's research will focus on the epigenetic links between social support, culture, and age. Her goal is to identify the causal mechanisms of social environments that contribute to premature aging.

  • Jeff Luck

    Jeff Luck is an Associate Professor with the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. His research focuses on performance of health care delivery systems and public health agencies, population health data for management and policy analysis, measuring and improving the quality of care, and implementation of new management practices and information systems in health care organizations.

    Dr. Luck currently serves on the Public Health Advisory Board, the Metrics & Scoring Committee, and the Hospital Performance Metrics Advisory Committee. 

  • Rick Settersten

    Rick Settersten, Ph.D. is Professor of Human Development and Family Sciences in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University, and Endowed Director of the Hallie E. Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families. For a decade, he was a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood and Public Policy.

    Dr. Settersten is a specialist in life-course studies, with a strong record of experience conducting research and collaborating across disciplines and across life periods. His research has often focused on the first and last few decades of adulthood, always with an eye toward understanding the whole of human life.

    Prior to moving to Oregon State, Rick rose through the faculty ranks from assistant professor to professor of Sociology at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

    A graduate of Northwestern University, Settersten has held fellowships at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education in Berlin, the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern, and the Spencer Foundation in Chicago.  He is author or editor of many scientific articles and several books, including Not Quite AdultsHandbook of Sociology of Aging, and On the Frontier of Adulthood.

    Besides MacArthur, his research has been supported by divisions of the National Institutes of Health—including major projects on genomic medicine (funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute), on efforts to control human aging (by the National Institute on Aging), and on late-life health outcomes of military service (also funded by NIA).

    Settersten recently participated in National Academy of Science/Institute on Medicine discussions of the health and wellbeing of young adults, and of the social demography, epidemiology, and sociology of aging.

    His research has been covered in many media outlets, including the Economist, New York Times, NPR, USA Today, and the Wall Street Journal.

  • Carolyn Aldwin

     

    Carolyn Aldwin is a Professor with the Department of Human Development & Family Sciences at Oregon State University. She also currently serves as the Director of the Gerontology Program at OSU, as well as a Visiting Professor with the Department of Psychology at the University of Connecticut. 

    Her research examines how psychosocial factors affect health, especially how individuals cope with stress. She also examines how personality, mental health and physical health change across the lifespan. Dr. Aldwin is particularly interested in factors which affect the rate of aging, as well as stress-related growth. 

     

     

  • Jeff Bethel

     

    Jeff Bethel is an Assistant Professor with the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. His research focuses on building adaptive capacity to address the health impact of occupational, environmental and natural hazards, particularly among vulnerable populations. Specifically, he examines the health effects of climate change including heat-related illness among farmworkers and other vulnerable populations, household- and community-level preparedness to disasters, efforts to increase adaptive capacity for climate change among local health departments. Dr. Bethel also studies best practices to implement epidemiologic methods to examine the health impact of disasters.

  • Stephanie Grutzmacher

     

    Stephanie Grutzmacher is an Assistant Professor with the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Grutzmacher's work focuses on food security, nutrition literacy, and the development and evaluation of family, school and community-based nutrition education programs for low-income populations. 

    Stephanie has conducted training programs with women in Afghanistan to improve family food security and dietary quality through backyard gardening. She has served as a faculty advisor for Public Health without Borders and the University of Maryland Alternative Breaks program, fostering experiential service learning experiences for undergraduate students in the areas of health and development.

  • David Dallas

     

    David Dallas is an Assistant Professor with the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. The overall aim of his research has been to improve the health of premature infants as they have been shown to have greatly reduced health outcomes in comparison with term-delivered, breast milk-fed infants. His work has been to develop mass spectrometry-based peptidomic techniques to assess proteins as they are digested. He is currently exploring how various types of proteins and food processing techniques alter protein digestibility. 

     

     

     

     

     

    David Dallas is an Assistant Professor with the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. The overall aim of my research has been to improve the health of premature infants as they have been shown to have greatly reduced health outcomes (including early mortality, developmental disorders, high risk of infection, etc.) in comparison with term-delivered, breast milk-fed infants. The greatly reduced digestive capability of premature infants means that these infants are not breaking down milk proteins in the same way as term infants, and may therefore be missing many bioactive peptides and glycopeptides encrypted in human milk proteins. This difference in digestive capacity may mean that premature infants are not receiving the full health benefits of milk. My work has been to develop mass spectrometry-based peptidomic techniques to assess proteins as they are digested. We are currently exploring how various types of proteins and food processing techniques alter protein digestibility. We are studying protein digestion in groups with lower digestive function, including infants, the elderly and people with gastrointestinal disease. We are examining how increased protein survival to the colon leads to increased microbial protein digestion (putrefaction) and the resulting toxic metabolites and gut inflammation. We are currently modeling infant digestion of milk proteins in a piglet model. With a collaborative approach, we are assessing digestion and putrefaction via peptidomics, metabolomics, microbial sequencing and inflammatory protein analysis.